Tag Archives: Indian wearing

Knowing Indian Banarasi Sarees

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The famed “Pashmina” of Kashmir received Geographical Indication (GI) rights last year and recently Banarasi silk products joined the league along with Tirupati laddu, Darjeeling Tea and Pochampalli. The other product from the state of Uttar Pradesh, India to receive GI is Malihabadi Dussehri mango. The Banarsi Silk Sari gets its recognition in the name of ‘Banaras Brocades and Sarees’.

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Banarasi Bunkar Samiti, an organization of banarasi handloom weavers along with eight other organizations is initiating the effort to receive the right to the Banarasi silk product. GI is a status given to certain products which is related to a specific geographical region or province and entitles certain qualities and privileges due to its geographical origin. The banarasi sari has been facing a lot of competition recently from saris manufactured in cities like Bhagalpur, Surat and Bangalore and the Geographical Indication is expected to cut the duplicates which had tagged off as banarasi. Rajni Kant, President of Human Welfare Association (HWA) confirmed the GI status and said “We dedicate this achievement to lakhs of handloom weavers in the region.

It will not only benefit the handloom weavers, but also exporters and consumers.” Almost 12 lakh people associated directly or indirectly with the silk industry would benefit from the GI status as this would restrict the misuse of the brand name Banarasi Sari. Banarasi sari is the finest Indian sari. The fine silk, opulent embroidery and silver and gold brocade, makes them highly sought after. The intricate Mughal designs are characteristic feature of these saris, intertwining foliate and floral motifs.

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The Banarasi silk saris are an inevitable part of any Indian bride’s trousseau. All Indian women wear the Banarasi sari on important occasions like wedding and are complemented by their finest jewellery. According to the GI certificate, Banarasi silk product fall under four classes (23-26), namely silk embroidery, textile goods, silk brocades, silk sari and dress material. The most important aspect of the GI certification is that no brocade or sari made outside the six identified districts of Uttar Pradesh, India can legally be sold as Banarasi sari and Brocade. The six identified districts are Varanasi, Jaunpur, Azamgarh, Chandauli, Mirzapur, and Bhadohi. There are mainly four varieties of Banarasi saris, among them are Organza (Kora) with zari work, Pure silk (Katan), Georgette, and Shattir. The banarasi sari and brocade are divided into categories like, Vaskat, Tissu, Butidar,Tanchoi, Jangla, and Cutwork according to the design process.

Banaras has been famous for the weaving of Wedding sariand was described by Ralph Fitch (1583-91) as a thriving cotton textile industry. The arrival of the Mughal period, around 14th century, introduced the intricate designs using silver and gold threads and the weaving of brocades became the trademark of Banaras. Ashok Kapoor, founder member of Eastern UP Exporters Association (EUPEA) passionately said “It is a big achievement for the people associated with the Banarasi saree industry. In this era of globalisation, it is essential to get the GI status.”

Article Source: EzineArticles.com

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Wedding season round the corner -How to Choose your Anarkalis!!

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Anarkali suits seem to be everyone’s favourite for the festive and wedding season. From celebrities wearing designer anarkali dresses to lay women like us, none of us can get enough of this opulent trend. While Anarkalis come in several designs and patterns, the ones with borders are timeless and quite a hit. If you’re planning to wear an anarkali this Diwali, here’s how you can choose the perfect anarkali border to make a dazzling outfit.

Why use an anarkali border?
While you can opt for embroidery, lace and other adornment to enhance your anarkali suits, borders are the latest and most enhancing trend. Designer Aditi Holani says, “Borders enhance the otherwise tonal kalis joined together.”

“Borders add an interesting twist to your anarkali outfit. They highlight the hem and provide visual and physical weight to the overwhelming flounced silhouette of the anarkali,” says designer Aniket Satam elaborating on the use of borders. He adds, “Borders also function as a height lengthening element in the design and gives a break from the monotony of extra long flounce and flare.”

Things to keep in mind while choosing an anarkali border
The border you choose can make or break a design as it can overpower and kill the look if you go wrong with it. Things like length, fabric and design of the anarkali play an important role while choosing the right border for your outfit.

Aniket says, “Maintaining the rhythmic balance of an outfit is an essential factor. Calf length anarkali should be finished with simple mirco borders. For floor length anarkalis, dress it up using different borders which are eight to 10 inches broad.”

“If your anarkali’s flare starts from the shoulder, you can opt for a heavy border,” says Aditi.

Designer Pawan Sachdeva explains how to use borders on different fabrics and colours. He says, “If the fabric of your anarkali is very delicate (such as chiffon), then stay away from heavily embroidered borders.” He adds, “If your outfit has too much work on it, opt for thin and delicate borders. Lastly, if the colour of the suit is too jazzy and vibrant, use a border that is subtle and vice versa.”

Borders according to your body type
Just like there are different patterns of Anarkalis for different body types, one border doesn’t work for all. Aniket tells us what border you should choose for your body type –

Petite: Women with a petite frame should sport bright and sleek styles. Avoid bold and broad anarkali borders as they will overpower the entire look. Pretty and dainty patterns, delicate cutwork and feminine textures work best for the petite body type.

Tall: Tall women are blessed as this is the best body type to sport an anarkali. A tall frame permits you to experiment with bold and broad borders. You can also fabric block and colour block your anarkali with interesting borders using graphic geometrics and bright Indian patterns such as gota, Kutch work and bright brocades.

Slim: If your body type is slim, avoid anything too fragile and delicate. Borders used in gradation and geometric pattern work well for this body type. Use similar borders on your sleeves as well.

PlumpAnarkalis are not a good option for women who are plump. But, if you still want to wear them, experiment with asymmetrical hems and uneven flare as it add lightness to the design. Avoid under bust cut and opt for the shoulder panel variety.

Trends in anarkali border designs

“Traditional South Indian karvat style woven varieties are quite haute this season”, says Aniket. Authentic Paithani and Karnataki temple borders also look great. Rose gold and copper finished borders are trendy this season, more than the regular gold and silver. “Borders in neon and bright colours such as orange, red, green, gold and silver with zari embroidery, kundan work and thread work are quite a hit this season,” concludes Sachdeva.

What to avoid
You can sometimes go terribly wrong with borders. Hence, it’s important that you avoid making certain mistakes. Holani says, “You need to keep in mind your body type before picking borders. Shorter frames should never opt for over-the-top or broad borders.” Borders can horizontally break the outfit into lengths and make one look shorter and larger. Aniket says, “Play with textures of the same tonal colour family and don’t be afraid to mix gold with silver, black with brown and shine with matt.” “Avoid pairing extremely contrasting colour borders with your suit,” says Sachdeva.

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Courtesy: Idiva.com