Tag Archives: ethnic

A traditional day in Gujarat

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Traditional Male Attire: Chorno & Kediyu       Traditional Female Attire: Chaniyo & Choli

ImageGujarat, the home to Gujarati speaking people is situated at the border of Rajasthan and Maharashtra, is one of the main centre of the Indus Valley Civilization.

 The folk tradition of Gujarat includes bhavai and raas-garba. The raas-garba is a folk dance done at the celebration of Navratri.  The traditional dress worn are Chaniaya Choli worn by the female and Chorno-Kediyu worn by the male. Raas dance is considered to be the form of ras-leela , which Lord Krishna used to perform when he lived the life of a cowherd boy in Gokul and Vrindavan.

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 ‘Kediyu’ or ‘angarakhu’ is the top worn by the male paired with churidar styled bottom known as chorno . The head dress is a turban known as ‘phento’ which is still seen worn by few especially the agriculturists.

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Women commonly put chaniya (petticoat in different colours) embroidered with ‘abhala’- small mirror pieces. The petticoat is paired with embroidery blouse known as choli or polku, along with odhani- a dupatta covering the body and the head .

In routine, Gujarati male wear dhoti with a short coat and women wear is sari and blouse.

Typical folk dance costumes in men for Raas-Garba  is a small coat called Keviya with tight sleeves and pleated frills at the waist with embroidered borders and shoulders ,chudidars and colorfully embroidered caps ,colored turban and colored kamarbandha ( waistbelt) .

For women, the dress is lehenga choli or ghahra choli . These cholis are brightly embroidered, waist length . Ghaghras or lehengas are ankle length skirts. The attire is completed by a dupatta.

Chunky silver jewellery goes perfect with the attire!

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A stitch in time for Jaisalmer women

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For fashion designer Tahir Sultan, creativity is one thing he values the most. It is but for him that today the NGO ‘I LoveJaisalmer’ he founded this year has become a beacon of hope for Women from Jaisalmer.

Manvendra Singh Shekhawat  owns a boutique hotel that lies 15 kms away from Jaisalmer’s historical fort. He discusses about his passion for the city and said how much he would like to give back to the community. Manvendra also expressed his intention to help the people of Jaisalmer and that he wanted to do something constructive for the community. Tahir , his friend,immediately latched on to this idea, and decided to help move things along. “While I worked with the village women and set up an infrastructure for design, production and quality control in order to produce home accessories, Manvendra went about clearing the city, the fort and some of the historical sites, ridding them of years of garbage,” says Tahir. What made the difference is the fact that Tahir managed to tap into the potential of these women, who, he knew, were cut out for this job. No wonder, a remarkable change has come over the lives of these women in the last few months thanks to the platform given by this NGO.

The village that ‘I Love Jaisalmer’ works with is Mulana. Tucked away 50 kms outside Jaisalmer, it lies in the middle of the desert and the people live in white cottages with thatched roofs. The women are hard working, and through a sustained educational programme, have become very enthusiastic about the cushions they produce. All the cushions are hand stitched. The older women teach this skill and technique to younger volunteers. They get paid by the piece and the sale of these cushions help empower them, giving them financial freedom. Part of the money earned goes towards maintaining Shri Jawahar Hospital. Plus now, their efforts are reaching places as far as Delhi, where Kitsch is focusing on giving back to the society by joining hands to support Tahir Sultan and the ‘I Love Jaisalmer’ organization. It will also retail these handcrafted cushions and the entire proceed will go towards supporting women and children in Jaisalmer.

timesofIndia.com

Beauties in black

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Black is one colour that usually should not be worn during festive and auspicious days, if superstitions are to be believed. But rules are meant to be broken! To stand out this festive season, bring out all your 50 shades of black and look like a sultry goddess. To get you inspired, we break down the looks of three celebs who worked the ethnic black look like gifted artists with a fascinating foresight.

FEMINA

Madhuri Dixit
This outfit defines grace and elegance. Embroidery on the waist and sleeves keeps the outfit interesting and makes the waist look smaller. The big gold border at the bottom adds the wow factor to the otherwise simple outfit. Since the neckline is simple, don’t be afraid to pile on neckpieces on an elegant outfit like this one.

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Bipasha Basu
Sultry and beautiful, Bipasha Basu gets it right in a black lehenga. You can break your entire black look by wearing a different colour dupatta. To emulate this look, wear coloured jewellery in red and greens for it to stand out from the black. A classic red bindi with red lips is perfect for this look.

FEMINA

Sonam Kapoor
Black and gold is one of the most stunning combinations. If you are going for this much coveted combo, opt for a sheer black blouse with a gold embroidered lehenga like Sonam and add a plain black silk dupatta to it. For a traditional Rajasthani look, wear uncut chokers, pile on cuffs and bangles and add a borla or a mang-tikka.

Courtesy: femina.in

Jhumkas: Timeless trend

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Beautiful, elegant and classic… jhumka is the perfect accessory for ethnic Indian wear.

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Anushka Sharma’s long pearly jhumkas complete her pale creamy anarkali dress.

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Gauhar Khan’s danglers complement her plain high neck dress.

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Rani Mukerji looks gorgeous in her sari and chunky metallic jewellery adds to her appeal.

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Sonali Bendre’s colourful jhumkas blend with her striking sari.

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Urmila Matondkar looks dazzling in her black and gold look and large ethnic jhumkas.

Courtesy:Femina.in

White Clothes evolution in India

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India is always abundant on colors, each with different meanings attached to it. Essentially, colors are an inherent part of Indian moods and traditions, but being a diverse country, each color speaks of differently on different geographies. White is the color that symbolizes peace, purity and wisdom, and is also ambiguously used to denote mourning and lifelessness.

Origin

During the Vedic period, all the different colors were associated with the various social castes that existed during that time. Hence ‘vama’ meaning ‘color’ was used to denote a particular caste. This no longer exists today, but, there are certain rituals that are passed from generation to generation and are deeply ingrained in our society. Hence, the color white denoting purity and light, which was exclusively reserved for the Brahmins or the higher caste during the Vedic Period, is still associated with them till date. White is a color of simplicity and this is why the members of the Jain sect wear white clothing. However, owing to the diversity of India, the exception to this rule can be seen in southern and western India where Brahmins wear brightly colored garb.

White is also a color that we associate with Hindu widows, as they are only permitted to don clothes of this attire. However, over the course of several years and through the emancipation of women, this norm has changed for the better. White has been associated with deep mourning and is the color that is still worn to funerals and ceremonies that mark death or the remembrance of a deceased. It is said that white clothes when worn by a widow help her to disconnect herself from the normal trappings and pleasures of life around her. This is commonly seen in the Northern part of India.
However, the southern part of India has a different perception and understanding of the color white as it is symbolic of purity, chastity and peace. India, being a home to multiple cultures and diverse population, has different interpretations of colors and symbols that vary across the length and breadth of the country.

The Making

White Red Saree

White Red Saree

Married women in the northern reaches of the country are not permitted to wear white on their wedding day, as white is associated with mourning and is therefore inauspicious. On the contrary the wedding attire of the bride in Gujarat is the ‘panetar saree which is a combination with red and white. Likewise, Bengali women wear white sarees with a red border on auspicious occasions. In Assam the bride wears a dress called the Mekhala Chaddar which is a white embellished saree and a Kerela bride wears a set mundu  which is a traditional white saree with a golden border for the wedding, as the color white is symbolic of chastity. The bridal saree of Odisha is called the ‘Saptakar’ and is made out of tussar silk with hues of white, red and black. The Indian Christian bride always dresses in white- be it a gown or a saree.
White is an amalgamation of the seven colors of the rainbow and that is why it is said to have the qualities of all the colors. In fact Saraswati, the goddess of knowledge is always seen in white dress, as the color is symbolic of knowledge, peace, cleanliness and purity. A lot of people in Ashrams and Yoga Groups wear white colors as it is also representative of spirituality.

The Trendsetter

kareena in white saree

White Saree

Lately, the color white has gained a lot of popularity owing to the various Bollywood divas and fashionistas, who have been photographed wearing white designer sarees and dresses. The white fashion trend was highlighted by Deepika Padukone’s white and gold saree that she flaunted at the Cannes Festival and became the most stylish show stopper on the red carpet. A lot of other Bollywood stars have also flaunted their white sarees, particularly Kareena Kapoor and Aishwarya Rai Bachchan who both appeared in almost identical white sarees and sleeveless red blouse ensembles.

 Courtesy : Utsavpedia.com

HOW TO WEAR THE ETHNIC TURBAN

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More than any other season, summer is a time of wanderlust. You’re eager to travel, discover new cultures… But if you not lucky enough to be going away anywhere, then try out some looks that will make you feel like you’re anywhere else but here! With its graphic patterns and bright colours, the ethnic turban is the perfect accessory to decorate your hair and make you feel like you’ve journeyed to a whole new place.

The ethnic trend. As soon as the warm weather arrives, the ethnic trend is a big feature of our wardrobe, especially our accessories.Headscarves, belts, turbans, the trend is sported in subtle hints to give it the showcase it deserves. When it comes to your hair, wear a turban on an up-do. Boho chic comes effortlessly with this accessory!

Who is it for? Anyone looking for accessories that speak of faraway places. A great festival accessory, choose yours in bright colours and make sure you wear it loud and proud. The perfect solution if you’re after something patterned and summery.

 

How to wear it. The turban is a great way to show off your face, so tie up your hair and place the turban on top of your head. Under the turban, create a high,messy,chignon. To do this, give your lengths some texture, then create a laid-back, bohemian chignon and secure with a bungee band.

When you’re done you can place the turban on your head. If you want something really trendy, choose a scarf with ethnic prints. Fold it until you’re left with a long rectangle. Roll it around the top of your head and bring the ends of the scarf to the front of your head. Twist the ends together and hide any bits that are poking out of the scarf. Finally, fix in place with hair grips.

 Courtesy:JLD

Krishna Mehta’s bridal collection sparkles at Lakme Fashion Week

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 It was no different this time – Krishna presented a beautiful collection of ethnic wear with minute touches of western elegance at Lakmé Fashion Week Winter/Festive 2010.

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Heavily embroidered jackets were teamed with saris or lehengas. Colours were muted and sophisticated with touches of silver and gold, crème and beige with gentle hints of black, red and purple. Loved the intricate chikan work and the rich sequined embellishments that Krishna used lavishly to give a festive touch to the creations.

Men’s wear had classic sherwanis with zardozi or chikan work – so understated yet festive.

We are so lusting after the structure cropped jackets with free free flowing lehengas. And that lemon georgette lehenga is going to get snapped in a second.